Wage & Hour

  • July 18, 2024

    BAE Gets Wage Claims Cut From Engineer's Retaliation Suit

    A former engineer for BAE Systems adequately alleged that it understood he was raising concerns about his overtime pay when it chose to fire him, a Maryland federal magistrate judge ruled, keeping alive the ex-worker's retaliation claim while cutting his wage claims against the U.S. Navy contractor.

  • July 18, 2024

    Mass. ABC Test Turns 20 As Contractor Debate Evolves

    A three-prong test for determining independent contractor status in Massachusetts continues to be central to litigation two decades after its current form took effect, and attorneys expect it will remain so as the gig economy expands.

  • July 18, 2024

    Famous Dave's Attys Can't Score Extra Fees In $1M Tip Deal

    Attorneys representing workers for Famous Dave's can't get additional fees from funds left over from a settlement resolving claims that the restaurant chain violated tip regulations, a Maryland federal judge ruled Thursday, saying the workers' counsel have already received enough money.

  • July 18, 2024

    FordHarrison Taps Wage-Hour Leader To Helm LA Shop

    FordHarrison LLP named the leader of its wage and hour practice to take over as managing partner in the firm's Los Angeles office, turning to an attorney who started at the firm over a decade ago as an associate.

  • July 18, 2024

    Dems Want DOL Child Labor Probe In Youth Work Programs

    Democratic members of the House Education and Workforce Committee called on the U.S. Department of Labor on Thursday to investigate potential risks of child labor violations in agency-approved youth work programs after recent infractions.

  • July 18, 2024

    Au Pair Co. Can't Arbitrate Wage Claims, 1st Circ. Told

    A group of former au pairs who say they were underpaid for their work has urged the First Circuit to affirm that Cultural Care can't force them into arbitration in Switzerland, calling the agency's position a delay tactic with no merit.

  • July 18, 2024

    TGI Friday's Server Inks $65K Deal In Minimum Wage Dispute

    A TGI Friday's franchise in Ohio agreed to pay $65,000 to end a worker's suit alleging it paid subminimum wages, according to court papers.

  • July 18, 2024

    Urgent Care Nurses Snag Collective Cert. In Wage Suit

    Nurses claiming an urgent care chain owes them wages can move forward as a collective in their suit, an Illinois federal judge ruled, saying the worker who lodged the suit showed she was similarly situated as her colleagues.

  • July 18, 2024

    Warner Bros. Hit With PAGA Suit By Background Actor

    Warner Bros. has not been paying background actors all their wages owed by failing to incorporate incentive payments into overtime calculations and requiring them to work through breaks unpaid, according to a Private Attorneys General Act suit filed in California state court.

  • July 18, 2024

    X's NYC Office Settles Ex-Janitors' Back Pay Suit

    A group of unionized janitors who used to work in the New York City offices of social media company X have settled a suit alleging the company failed to comply with a city law requiring it to keep the janitors on for 90 days after terminating their contract.

  • July 17, 2024

    Trimmed Geico Wage Suit Stays In Federal Court

    A wage and hour class action against Geico belongs in federal court, a California federal judge ruled Wednesday, saying the insurance company estimated the first claim alone is valued at over $5 million, but also cut all but two of the allegations from the lawsuit, citing vague, murky evidence.

  • July 17, 2024

    Aviation Co. Didn't Waive Arbitration In Wage Suit

    An aviation company did not waive its rights to raise the arbitration flag in a suit claiming it failed to pay workers for missed rest and meal breaks because it pointed to their agreements several times, a California federal judge ruled.

  • July 17, 2024

    Charter School, Worker Can't Get OK For OT, Retaliation Deal

    A Florida federal judge denied a deal to end a suit alleging a charter school failed to pay a custodian for more than 40 hours a week and fired her when she complained about it, citing a lack of information regarding attorney fees and an overbroad release of claims, according to court papers filed Wednesday. 

  • July 17, 2024

    Airport Ramp Agent's Wage Suit Stays In Federal Court

    An airport ramp agent's wage and hour suit against an aviation service company can't return to state court, a California federal judge ruled, saying the company's calculations of the unpaid wages and damages at issue far exceed the $5 million threshold required to keep a lawsuit in federal court.

  • July 17, 2024

    9th Circ. Shows Call Center Boot-Up Time Remains In Dispute

    A recent Ninth Circuit decision to send a wage and hour collective action by call center workers back to a lower court demonstrates how courts continue to grapple with ruling on claims for brief amounts of time. Here, Law360 explores the issue.

  • July 17, 2024

    Burlington Assistant Managers Seek OK Of $5.2M OT Deal

    A collective of over 800 Burlington Coat Factory assistant store managers asked a New Jersey federal judge to sign off on a $5.2 million settlement ending their unpaid overtime claims, over a year after the court shot down a proposed $11 million deal, according to court records.

  • July 17, 2024

    Drivers, Co. Need Extra Details To Mull Arbitration Carveout

    A California federal judge told a transportation worker and the at-home respiratory care provider he sued for unpaid wages to file additional documents before deciding whether arbitration is necessary, saying it is not clear whether the worker engaged in interstate commerce.

  • July 17, 2024

    Fiat Chrysler, Workers To Mediate OT Dispute

    A Michigan federal judge agreed to hit pause on a proposed class and collective action accusing Fiat Chrysler of failing to fully pay workers overtime while the parties engage in mediation.

  • July 16, 2024

    FTC's In-House Kroger Case Delayed Until After Fed Suit

    Kroger and Albertsons are getting a limited respite from the Federal Trade Commission's looming in-house merger challenge after an agency administrative law judge agreed to delay the case, but only until immediately after an Oregon federal court fight plays out.

  • July 16, 2024

    JB Hunt To Pay $4.2M To End Wash. Pay Range Suit

    J.B. Hunt Transport will fork over $4.2 million to a class of 2,200 job applicants to settle a lawsuit accusing the freight company of failing to include salary ranges in job postings and violating Washington state law, according to a court order tentatively approving the deal.

  • July 16, 2024

    5th Circ. Preserves Class Cert. In Fringe Benefits Fee Fight

    The Fifth Circuit affirmed a district court's decision to certify a mega class of more than 290,000 workers in a suit against several benefits administration companies alleging mismanagement of their non-union fringe benefits, but found the action should proceed as opt-out and not mandatory class action.

  • July 16, 2024

    Delta's $16M Pay Stub Deal Scores Initial OK

    A California federal judge signed off on a $16 million deal Tuesday settling a suit accusing Delta Air Lines of wage statement violations under the California Labor Code and Private Attorneys General Act, finding the deal fair and reasonable.

  • July 16, 2024

    Fired Pizza Worker's Retaliation Suit Headed For Trial

    A Kentucky federal court denied a restaurant's request for a win in a lawsuit the U.S. Department of Labor brought accusing the restaurant's co-owner of retaliating against a worker with concerns that she was not being paid correctly, saying a jury should parse the parties' differing versions of events.

  • July 16, 2024

    Minn. Home Care Co., DOL Ink 135K Deal In OT Suit

    A Minneapolis home healthcare company will pay $135,000 to halt a U.S. Department of Labor suit alleging it failed to pay workers overtime rates after a federal judge signed off on a deal Tuesday.

  • July 16, 2024

    Dairy Queen Franchisee Says Chevron Ruling Solves OT Fight

    A Dairy Queen franchisee owner told the Fifth Circuit that the recent U.S. Supreme Court decision tossing the Chevron doctrine officially makes clear that the U.S. Department of Labor can't raise employees' salary thresholds in a federal overtime exception. 

Expert Analysis

  • Eye On Compliance: Employee Social Media Privacy In NY

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    A New York law that recently took effect restricts employers' ability to access the personal social media accounts of employees and job applicants, signifying an increasing awareness of the need to balance employers' interests with worker privacy and free speech rights, says Madjeen Garcon-Bonneau at Wilson Elser.

  • Draft Pay Equity Rule May Pose Contractor Compliance Snags

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    The Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council's recently proposed rule that would prohibit government contractors from requesting certain job applicants' salary history seems simple on the surface, but achieving compliance will be a nuanced affair for many contractors who must also adhere to state and local pay transparency laws, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.

  • Where 9th Circ. Lowe's Ruling Leaves PAGA Jurisprudence

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    Leah Kennedy and Carolyn Wheeler at Katz Banks discuss the legal landscape and controlling precedent around the Private Attorneys General Act that led to the Ninth Circuit's Johnson v. Lowe's decision last month on individual PAGA wage claims, and explore the open questions that it leaves.

  • Class Actions At The Circuit Courts: March Lessons

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    In this month's review of class action appeals, Mitchell Engel at Shook Hardy discusses four notable circuit court decisions on topics from consumer fraud to employment — and provides key takeaways for counsel on issues including coercive communications with putative class members and Article III standing at the class certification stage.

  • Spartan Arbitration Tactics Against Well-Funded Opponents

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    Like the ancient Spartans who held off a numerically superior Persian army at the Battle of Thermopylae, trial attorneys and clients faced with arbitration against an opponent with a bigger war chest can take a strategic approach to create a pass to victory, say Kostas Katsiris and Benjamin Argyle at Venable.

  • EEOC Case Reminds That Men Can Also Claim Pay Bias

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    The Maryland State Highway Administration recently settled U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission claims that a male employee was paid less than his female colleagues, highlighting why employers should not focus on a particular protected class when it comes to assessing pay bias risk, say Barbara Grandjean and Audrey Merkel at Husch Blackwell.

  • 2026 World Cup: Companies Face Labor Challenges And More

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    Companies sponsoring or otherwise involved with the 2026 FIFA World Cup — hosted jointly by the U.S., Canada and Mexico — should be proactive in preparing to navigate many legal considerations in immigration, labor management and multijurisdictional workforces surrounding the event, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Avoiding Jurisdictional Risks From Execs' Remote Work

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    Following a California federal court's recent decision in Evans v. Cardlytics — where the case was remanded to state court because the company’s executives worked remotely in California — there are several steps employers can take to ensure they will not be exposed to unfavored jurisdictions, says Eric Fox at Quarles & Brady.

  • Eye On Compliance: Workplace March Madness Pools

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    With March Madness set to begin in a few weeks, employers should recognize that workplace sports betting is technically illegal, keeping federal and state gambling laws in mind when determining whether they will permit ever-popular bracket pools, says Laura Stutz at Wilson Elser.

  • Handbook Hot Topics: Workplace AI Risks

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools penetrate workplaces, employers should incorporate sound AI policies and procedures in their handbooks in order to mitigate liability risks, maintain control of the technology, and protect their brands, says Laura Corvo at White and Williams.

  • Water Cooler Talk: Investigation Lessons In 'Minority Report'

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    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper discuss how themes in Steven Spielberg's Science Fiction masterpiece "Minority Report" — including prediction, prevention and the fallibility of systems — can have real-life implications in workplace investigations.

  • Class Actions At The Circuit Courts: February Lessons

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    In this month's review of class action appeals, Mitchell Engel at Shook Hardy discusses five notable circuit court decisions on topics from property taxes to veteran's rights — and provides key takeaways for counsel on issues including class representative intervention, wage-and-hour dispute evidence and ascertainability requirements.

  • NYC Cos. Must Prepare For Increased Sick Leave Liability

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    A recent amendment to New York City's sick leave law authorizes employees for the first time to sue their employers for violations — so employers should ensure their policies and practices are compliant now to avoid the crosshairs of litigation once the law takes effect in March, says Melissa Camire at Fisher Phillips.